SO.........WHAT ARE WE WORKING ON TODAY??

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Variations on Wide Triple Relaxed Romans

I'm back- nobody even knew I was gone!- after a minor medical procedure, my world started spinning after a bad reaction to the painkiller I was prescribed, and it took five days to start to feel like myself again.  Yesterday I didn't try to sew much- I didn't quite trust myself to cut fabric!- so I went for a ride and delivered projects that were completed before I took off. 

Ready to be packed up- here are two extremes of relaxed Romans: a very wide shade- 96", actually to be used as an adjustable valance- with three swoops, made from a lightweight upholstery fabric and lined; on the right, a very narrow one- 22"- functional, with dog-ears.  By now you're used to seeing the workroom in all its glorious messiness, right?......

For the wide valance/shade, I showed the client the following pictures of approximately 90" wide shades so she could decide which variation she preferred.  As you can see, she chose the flat version with the least droop.


In the first, embroidered sheer linen is lined with batiste, and completely flat along the top.

Here, the top is flat, but the bottom flap that showcases the trim flattens out the droop.   I think these shades were closer to 100" so the sections are a little wider than those in the other three examples.  These were a plain sheer lined with voile.

Tiny pleats at each section add fullness to this unlined version.  The little bead trim at the bottom adds weight and helps accent the droop.

This lined cotton sheer shade has deeper pleats, and tails; it could be called a triple London shade; it was designed to complement the adjacent single London.

To complete my gallery of triple relaxed Romans, here is a center-pleat version made from antique satin, lined with Apollo.
The workroom shelf messiness from 10 months ago looks oddly similar to its current state, doesn't it?

9 comments:

  1. Love the 4th pic ! Sorry to hear you were sick, get better soon.

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  2. Great variations, every tweak in the design makes such a difference.
    Especially love the center pleat triple, it adds so much to a solid fabric. What is that fabric? It bunches so full at the bottom. Interlined too?
    Happy you are feeling better!

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  3. Thanks Tammy, and Marie- for the longest time I've been wanting to post these pictures in one place to show how small variations can be manipulated to achieve design goals.
    And yes I'm feeling much better, thank you! and back to work....

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  4. Hi. I was wondering if there are any patterns or DIY instructions for this type of shade. I am specifically speaking of the one above where you said, "Tiny pleats at each section add fullness to this unlined version. The little bead trim at the bottom adds weight and helps accent the droop."

    I am struggling to get this done, and yours is the first site where I found exactly what I was looking for.

    Thanks,
    Melissa

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    Replies
    1. Melissa, a relaxed Roman is simply a shade with lift lines just on the sides. The wide shades have additional lift lines; a tiny bit of extra fabric is added for little pleats or tucks, which creates a little more droop. I hope that helps!

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  5. Yes. Thank you. Just wondering, is the fabric cut in a semi circle to get the extra fabric for the droop? Also, do you use a support bar bellow to keep them from sagging away from the window edge?
    Thanks again,
    Melissa

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    Replies
    1. Nope! The fabric is just a big rectangle. The tiny tucks give all the droop. Definite "must" to a weight bar, in a fabric tube, tacked at each lift line. It would be baggy saggy mess without it!

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    2. One last question. Where could I find a weight bar in a fabric tube? Do I cut it to measurement myself?
      You are totally awesome at prompt communication, by the way.
      Thanks.

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    3. Hi Melissa- I don't know if you're a workroom or a DIY homeowner. However, I buy fabric tubing from Rowley Company. They also sell weight bars. Other drapery workroom product distributors have similar items. Or, you can make a tube out of fabric, and buy a piece of rodding at Home Depot or Lowe's. You would cut the rod to size yourself unless you get it from a store that offers that service.

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