SO.........WHAT ARE WE WORKING ON TODAY??

Saturday, January 22, 2011

London shade with encased cord

This London shade works perfectly with encased cord, even though it's made from a rather heavy upholstery fabric.

Here's the back.  There is no clutch, just a cord lock, so I ran two cords up the far side to help the cord tension remain even.  I tied a doubled cord to the encased cord and pulled it through. 

Originally this shade was a big "oops."  I mixed up the width and length; instead of 45" wide and 61" long, I made it 61" wide and 45" long.  Luckily, I had made a deep facing, plus there was enough fabric leftover from the repeat to add to the length, so there was enough fabric to re-make it correctly.  Though I suppose I should be embarrassed about my mistake, I'm posting my "oops"anyhow so you can see a 61" shade versus a 45" shade.  In my opinion, 61" is just too wide for a London, so I'm glad this one was wrong!

Here is the "good" shade again.  The pleats are set in at 5".  They can be whatever distance in you want, but the client didn't want the tails to droop lower than the swag, so I placed the pleat close to the end of the board to make the tails shorter. 

Here is a shade with pleats set in more like 8", and the tails droop more.

And the position of the pleats on this shade were determined by the width of the fabric, in order for the seam not to show.  This shade is about 80" wide.  We added a third lift line in the center since 80" is way too wide for a single-swag London shade.  There is no center pleat.


Here is the same idea, but with a center pleat.  This one is about 75" wide.  

And the same double shade with its neighboring single-swag shade.

2 comments:

  1. I have not heard of using double cords. Did you use the double cord because of the cord shroud or do you always use double cords on the column farthest from the cord lock?

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  2. Hi Peggy-
    I got in the habit of using two cords on the row of rings farthest from the cord lock, for two reasons. First, then I'd have 3 cords that could be braided. Second, the farthest lift line tends to be more slack than the near lift line because of the further distance. The extra cord gives it more strength so the shade doesn't go up crookedly.
    Now with the encased cord, using a cord lock, I still consolidate the cords by braiding them after tying the knot under the cord lock, so I still need 3 lines.

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